Sunday Music

Strange times. Another week flew by. Yesterday I lead a few people through the city on a tour, to my astonishment they really listened to what I had to tell them, about buildings, history’n stuff. Easy enough with all those old things standing around here.
Accidentally I found an employment ad for a post in a specialised archive, wish me luck please.
To balance the dancing Austrians from last weekend this Sunday Music features Yusef LATEEF (Ger., Eng.), who is seemingly still active, at least five years ago while in his high eighties he still performed. His 1961 album  Eastern Sounds was influenced by the music of the Near and Far East, and in a way groundbreaking. In the following take he plays a Chinese flute called xun (Ger., Eng.), accompanied by Barry HARRIES (Ger., Eng.) on piano, Ernie FARROW (Ger., Eng.) on rabat (Ger., Eng.), and Lex HUMPHRIES (Ger., Eng.) on drums.
Hope you enjoy it, and that we have all a relaxed and easy week.

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17 thoughts on “Sunday Music

  1. specialised archive… prive library… my dream jobs!

    hypnoyic music… that little redundant beat… that little melodic theme spinning in circles…

    Sendig you Lady Luck, liber Herr. *crosses fingers*

  2. Thank you for the luck, dear Z, I can use it. I found LATEEF by chance when I looked for music of Abdullah IBRAHIM, especially his “African Market” – a very nice and gentle swinging tune, but I found only versions with loud and hard rhythm-sections. If you are interested in flutes – there are very special instruments in Japan and China, made from clay, bamboo or single grass leaves. They demand a very dedicated way to produce sounds and force the player to a certain pureness. Sometimes I like to listen to such sounds. I think LATEEF was (one of) the first musician to use Eastern instruments in Jazz, a world musician avant la letre.

    It is just a letter written, dear Jon. I think I meet the requirements – and it would be a pretty good address. Lady Luck is welcome here!

  3. This music is brilliant! Thanks Mr Mags and good luck in your persuit of employment. Who knows? You may well become a specialist tour guide… and given that you know and can provide a context for what you are talking about why the surprise that people listened and enjoyed the tour? It certainly beats some pimply kid reading from the tourist brochure and pointing at the wrong building…

  4. The flute seems eternal in music. I have always liked Paul Horn at Agra playing in the Taj Mahal.
    Come to think of it, I believe he played echoes in Arizona’s Canyon de Chelly.

    Kinda bringing out the vibrations of the ancient sandstone formations.

  5. I have several of Yusef Lateef’s albums and consider him an artist with a unique sound.

    I often play the music of Rahsaan Roland Kirk as well … another unique artist.

    Good luck to you, Mein Herr.

  6. [off-topic. sorry]

    Just dropping by to boost your standing in the search engines!

    Knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob knob.

    Knob.

  7. Glad that you like it, dear Princess. Last year I did a special tour – I am sure none of the professional tour guides has it in the program, because it leads a bit astray into the not so nice parts of the “smiling baroque” city.

    I was lucky to have them, dear Austere – brought in a nice dinner!

    Hello Goatman, nice to see you again! I have to look for Paul Horn, thank you for mentioning him. The ancients thought that there is a special tone in everything, I think it lives on in the idea of a universel harmony.

    Thank you Mitzi, finally a useful city guide!

    Thank you for the tip about Rahsaan Roland Kirk, MJ!

    That’s hot knobbing – thank you Knauf LX – it surely boosts the standing in diverse rankings – that’s SEO I can understand! Leaves me no choice: I have to prepare a post about “Knobs of my life” or something.

    Is this a haiku, Foam?

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