Another Boring Book List

It is been a bit since the last book list, it appeared here in early March I think.
These posts are tagged with “books”, perhaps I should categorise them under “Books”. Now follow in no particular order, just as they come from the heap, books I read since March.

OPPERMANN, Hans : Julius Caesar in Selbstzeugnissen und Bilddokumenten. Reinbek 1968 (rowohlts monographien, ed. by Kurt KUSENBERG, 135)
I have to admit that this is the first time I read a coherent biography of Julius. The depiction of Julius’ life is broad, not limited on one or two aspects, The author likes his subject, but does not idolize his hero. All the more I was astounded when I learned from the biographical wikipedia article about OPPERMANN (here) that he was a fervent national socialist who worked on a ns-conform classic philology while he was professor at the university of Freiburg until 1944. After the war he was not allowed back in the (west-)German university, but still good enough for teaching at Hamburgian Gymnasien. Given the common tendency in German academia after 1945 to forget & forgive, where after a few years the same old blockheads showed up, and saw to continuity, who were already shouting ex cathedra before 1939, I think it is remarkable to see that this man was shunt off into school teaching – he really was not acceptable any more. Nevertheless, old nazi or not, this biography of Julius is informative, well written, and well readable even after nearly fifty years.

BONER, Georg : Laupersdorf. Unsere Heimat im Wandel der Zeit.
Erster Teil 1968 : Von der Frühzeit bis zum Ausgang des Mittelalters
Zweiter Teil 1973 : Vom frühen 16. bis zum ausgehenden 18. Jahrhundert
Dritter Teil [1986] : Von der Revolution von 1798 bis an die Schwelle des 20. Jahrhunderts
A work of love. Laupersdorf (Ger., Eng.) is a small village in Kanton Solothurn. It is mostly Roman-Catholic, belongs to the diocese of Solothurn. The author (1908-1991) (Ger. only) was a Swiss historian and archivist, a prolific writer, long-time collaborator of the Aargauer Staatsarchiv. The community expressed its wish to have a history of the village, and they turned to the man who was best suited to write it. So this “simple” “Dorfgeschichte”, village history, is written lege artis – and well readable too. If you are interested in small Swiss villages …

FABRICIUS, Klaus ; SAUNDERS, Red (editors) : 24 Hours in the Life of Los Angeles. First print, New York June 1984
Another village, another approach : Not the history, but the Now – and this as full as possible. So they sent out a lot of photographers into the “Olympic City ’84”, and out came a portrait of this strange place, fascinating after 33 years.
I could not find more about Mr FABRICIUS, perhaps he is behind this photo blog.

SCHMIDT-Eppendorf, Peter : Sylt. Memoiren einer Insel. Dokumente, Chroniken, Berichte aus 1001 Jahren. Husum 1977
Now I know anything about Keytum, Morsum, Arxum, Westerlant & Rantum what is there to know. Monsignore (Ger., Eng.) SCHMIDT-Eppendorf seems to be a colourful character. Interesting book about a landscape that is totally alien to me : Imagine sand dunes wandering over villages !

HERBERSTEIN, Sigmund v. : Das alte Rußland. Übertragen von Wolfram von den STEINEN. Mit einem Nachwort von Walter LEITSCH. 2. Auflage, Zürich 1985
I wrote about this book and its author already here.

WUNDERLICH, Dieter : Sprachen der Welt. Warum sie so verschieden sind und sich doch alle gleichen. Darmstadt 2015
I doubt that I understood it. WUNDERLICH gives an introduction into the world of “language”, the system to classify & organise this wonderful cosmos, answers a lot of questions around “language”. But finally I have no clue why they are so different. This is surely not the fault of the author Dieter WUNDERLICH (Ger.), who thankfully writes clearly and describes complicated issues in a way that even I can get my buckethead around it.

GÜNTHER, Sonja : Design der Macht. Möbel für Repräsentanten des “Dritten Reiches”. Mit einem Vorwort von Wolfgang Fritz HAUG. Stuttgart 1992
GÜNTHER describes how the “Vereinigte Werkstätten” (Ger.) became the main production place for ameublement the heads of the Third Reich finally had in their representative rooms. Interesting pictures, so you know what not to put into your salon.

PRIESNER, Claus : Chemie. Eine illustrierte Geschichte. Darmstadt 2015
Finally a history of this terrible subject “chemistry” I have a chance to understand. With a lot of colourful pictures too. PRIESNER (Ger.) is a noted historian of science, together with Karin FIGALLA he edited a lexicon of alchemy. Even something so dreadful as “chemistry” can have an interesting history !

 

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4 thoughts on “Another Boring Book List

  1. Chemistry was one of my favorite subjects in school. Learning about the elements and doing the lab experiments were interesting and great fun. The math to make the chemical equations balance, not so much.

  2. Ready for some historical fiction? One of my favorite books is “All the Light We Cannot See” By Anthony Doerr

    Hopefully you can find it in German. It looks like a very large book, but actually there is a lot of blank page to present each chapter as a minuet, a slow dance between the two main characters, a German orphan boy sent off to Hitler’s youth and a French girl in a German-occupied city. I was interested to read it because of the dual narrative between the boy and the girl. I also wanted to explore how the author wrote the girl’s point-of-view because she is blind. I have to say, it was one of the most visually interesting books I’ve ever read, when all the sense were applied. Very well done! I think it should translate well, the words have one meaning, not double or triple entendre (French “play on words”)

    I prefer to read about Biology than Chemistry, like how creatures adapt to their environment, instead of how molecules adapt to their environment.

  3. Thank you for showing me this book, I have not heared about it Melanie. Published in 2014, I doubt that there is already a translation – I will try to get it via my local library.

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