Tag: movie clip Wed.

Movie Clip Wednesday

I am only one day late – so I improved at least for 50% – YAY! – compared to the Sunday Music on Tuesday.
The lovely Joanna Cake hosts Movie Clip Wednesday. Two weeks ago the theme was “Best Humans under Attack Movie”, and my first thought was BURTON’s Mars Attacks! (1996, Ger., Eng.); then I remembered what Groucho MARX used to call the “war film”, Duck Soup (1933, Ger., Eng., review) (there’s the famous mirror scene!); another possibility would have been the seemingly unknown Vietnam picture “Charlie Mopic”, correct title is 84C MoPic (1988, Eng.), a very early example of a mockumentary or “found footage”, a genre I like very much.
Last week’s theme was “Best ‘Voyeur’ Movie”, and of course the pair of Peeping Tom  (1960, Ger., Eng., review) and Psycho (1960, Ger., Eng., review) sprang up in my mind: While the career of Michael POWELL (Ger., Eng.) as a director was destroyed by this film, HITCHCOCK’s (Ger., Eng.) indiscreet look into the shower at once became a box office hit and was nominated for four academy awards. A third possibility would have been David Holzman’s Diary (1967, Eng., review), another mockumentary nobody knows.
This week’s theme is “Best Doctor Movie”. Ei – that’s a tough one … There’s Dr. Who, but I know him only by name; there’s Dr. Zhivago (1965, Ger., Eng.), oh really … I have a fade memory of Dr. Bock from The Hospital (1971, Eng.), not very clear at all. But I do remember a very interesting tv series about a young doctor who has to work in a small town in Alaska called Cicely, it’s his payback because the state of Alaska payed for his studium: In German it was called Ausgerechnet Alaska, the original title was Northern Exposure. I liked it.

*

*

Advertisements

Movie Clip Wednesday

“Public Disorder” Joanna Cake saied, the host of Movie Clip Wednesday. I have a problem with “public disorder”, simply because there seems to be no adequate german translation. Öffentliche Ruhestörung can range from being drunk on a public place (sitting on a park bank with a can of beer and a cigarette can be a kind of offense in some cities) to major hooligan riots destroying the inner city district of the “enemy” club’s town. That would be no more Vergehen (offense) but a major Verbrechen (crime).
In the end all films are about breach of rules, about what one does, does not and why. Maybe superheroes, male and female, are a kind of exception: I mean this Rambo bloke singlehandedly flattens a small town and somehow one can not be angry with him. One wants to pat him on the head and say: Stop sobbing, bubbele, blow your nose and vanish in the woods.

But there are forgotten superheroes. And I bet none of my dear readers remembers Cleopatra Schwartz. She solves problems, burns down the ghetto, and manages to be the good god fearing wife of rebbe Schwartz – a true example and inspiration for all of us. And she spurs singlehandedly the national weapon industry,  he would be proud of her.
So see this little snippet about Cleopatra Schwartz – hope you enjoy it!

*

*

Movie Clip Wednesday

This week’s theme for Movie Clip Wednesday is Love Stories, as Joanna Cake saied. Oh my … I had to think of Takeshi KITANO‘s (Ger., Eng., about) Hana-Bi (Ger., Eng.) (1997). She’s termially ill. He did anything to bring her to this beach. It’s the end of the road. It’s all about love.

 

*

*

Movie Clip Wednesday

“Best woman pretending to be a man movie” Joanna Cake saied. There are not so many storming before my inner eye … Yes, there is Eva MATTES (Ger., Eng.): She was working with FASSBINDER (Ger., Eng.) (1945-1982), later with HERZOG (Ger., Eng.), and portrayed HWF impressively in Ein Mann wie Eva (A Man like EVA) (1984). Well, yes … Neuer Deutscher Film and all … pass the Kokain.  It is a Hosenrolle (Ger., Eng.) of course. Classical Hosenrollen, women pretending to be men, can be found in opera and operetta. And there is Portia in The Merchant of Venice (Ger., Eng., text).
The first film adaption of The Merchant dates from 1914: The first full length film directed by a woman, Lois WEBER (Ger., Eng.) (1881-1939), who also stars as Portia.
Lois WEBER is seemingly forgotten. Her blog sits there alone since 2008 … I found no video of her Merchant, and of course no clip showing her as Portia, only a very bad photography. I do not know which of the damn critics LIONHEART (known to the world under his nom de plume Vincent PRICE (Ger., Eng.) (1911-1993) chooses to receive the treatment Shylock ment to give to Antonio in Shakespeare’s play – in his adaption, Theater of Blood (Ger., Eng.), well,  the critic surprisingly has a heart, so he pays his depths.

Theater of Blood is available on youtube. Here’s part one.

*

*