Sunday Music

This was an interesting week. I learned about humans and what they do (not very nice things), and generally tried to hold things together, what I managed not totally unsuccessfully.
Apart from that I wait for a telephone call, it should already have come in a week earlier. Authorities, & private organisations from a certain size onwards, have all time of the world at their disposal – or maybe they are all too friendly and want make me a present for Christmas.
I am becoming a bit nervous, because from 23rd of December until 7th of January the country is effectively shut down, just the costs are running as usual. But we’ll ride out this one too.
After all that “Whirling” last week that sent Mitzi in a dizzy spin – she lost almost her Stopfpilz ! – this Sunday Music is a bit more traditional. Les Loups play a tango, Guitarra Que Llora, the weeping guitar, recorded in Buenos Aires, May 1928.
Les Loups, or Los Lobos, are a very young Oscar ALEMÀN (Ger., Eng.) (1909-1980) and Gastón BUENO LOBO (1891-1939). About LOBO exists no wiki-article, but this blog about ALEMÀN brings a post about his early partner. Here is a video with footage of ALEMÀN, shown to a gentle swinging number, Hombre mio ; he was also featured in a  2001 documentation, Oscar ALEMÀN, vida con swing.
But now let’s tango – hope we’ll have a good week ahead.

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Good Girl Anni

This morning Anni from next door felt the need to make some points clear. First of all she stated that it was a really bad fancy to get up so early (“Ich will in mein Bett !” / I want in my bed !), and that getting dressed to go out into the cold darkness was also not the brightest idea this morning (“Ich will mich nicht anziehen !” / I do not want to get dressed !). Also the impending visit to the kindergarten was not to her taste (“Ich will nicht in den Kindergarten !” / I do not want to go to the kindergarten !).
Apropos taste, what her father had presented her with for breakfast was seemingly not what her mother would usually put on the table (“Ich will das nicht essen !” / I do not eat this !).
Her father is a physicist at the uni labs here, he is slim and looks healthy, perhaps he gave her a carrot or something, surely not chocolate-coated-sugar-bombs – not that she needed additional energy, all natural and already taking off.
Ahja her mother, (“Ich will Mamma !” / I want my mother !), she’s with Anni’s younger brother away on some family gathering or such, just a few days.
When her father called from another room to get ready and dress (he seldom raises his voice), because it was time to leave, she switched to a fake crying that was not convincing. She clearly felt no bodily payne, and her father, despite his carrot-obsession, never hits his children – the “crying” really needs a bit of effort & training from her.
Anni was simply terribly infuriated (“echt angefressen” – I guess one could translate this with “seriously pissed off”).
She did not only tell her father, me – the next door neighbour -, the people on our floor, but I guess the inhabitants of the whole village what she felt about this early morning situation. She kept on her stark communication while I heard either the table or a chair being dragged over the floor – she seemingly clung to a table leg despite her father’s repeated requests to release it (“Lass’ endlich los !” / Take yer hands off now !) – and she kept her protest up until the elevator doors shut (“Ich will net!” / I do not want !), incorruptible.
I like Anni. She has character (& good lungs) and gets her priorities right. It’s better to stay in the warm bed until daylight than being dragged into the kindergarten through cold drizzle in the damn-dark-morning, the last extension of a long, cold night. And I like that a five-year-old clearly says what she wants and what not.
It is sad to know that Anni has no chance to break this stupid rule that kindergarten, pre-school. school and work has to start at eight o’clock in the morning, and that there is no chance to switch to a civilised time, at least one hour later would help. I really sympathise with her, because I hated to sit in the classroom at 07:55, the first two hours were mostly lost. I think this rule is a leftover from the times of the Kaiser. I wished her the best, and slept until 10:30.

Sunday Music

It’s convenient (and laziness) that I do not have to think about a title for the Sunday post. At the moment it would be something like “Why can’t these asocial basteds downstairs not keep quiet ? Not even once a week, on a Sunday, they are able to shut up. Why do we sent people not longer in the quarries or the mines ? Or Australia ? Where is the inquisition when you need it ?”
So I put the headphones over my ears and listen to sounds – like Dick RAJIMAKERS’ (Ger., Eng.) (1930-2013) Song of the Second Moon (1957, together with Tom DISSEVELT (Eng. Nl.) (1921-1989), here) – while I sort through the files on my computer. It is time to delete the unnecessary items, keep & store other things ; and I always wanted to work through the tons of images – some are acceptable, some are just a waste of space.
RAJIMAKERS is a pioneer of electronic music, a reader about him was published in 2007, his works until 1997, are released on three CDs (here’s a link to the second edition). In his œvre we find experimental pieces (like Contrasts or Tweeklank) next to more accommodating, less unwieldy sounds, like the happy-sih Whirling (Electronic Movements, 1962). I hope you like it – and if you have nothing better to do, explore RAJIMAKER’s world of sounds and early electronica in general : It’s a beeping and scratching, a sheer delight.
I wish you a quiet & uneventful week !

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P.s
Google / Youtube seems to have installed a new auto-play, at least I encountered this the first time today.

Vom Ess-Zett (ß)

From the ongoing series “Bootless Knowledge for Everybody”.

I was reading in the Dæmonomania (mentioned here), innocently enough, when I came upon the following interesting passage :

Seiteinmal kundbar / daß wo ein Zauberer oder ein Hexin nur das Pulfferlein darvon in einen Schaaffstall leget / daß gleich das Viech darvon stirbt / wo es Gott nicht sonderlich bewaret; (gleich wie auch die Wurmkrämer ein Ratte[n] Aaß / die Mäuß darmit zutöden / wissen darauß zubereiten / daher es auch seinen Namen Maußzwibel bekommen.)”

Maußzwibel – that must be what he mentions in the previous paragraph as “Mörzwibel” or Squilla. A short research brings us the following result: In the Capitulare de Villis (Ger., Eng.) we find under number 16 a plant called “squilla(m)”, Urginea maritima (L.) Baker, also called “Meerzwiebel” (Ger., Eng.). The plant is known through the whole ancient world for medical uses. That the plant is deadly to mice and rats is mentioned in the Kräuterbuch of Tabernaemontanus (Ger., Eng.), one of the most important books of its kind of the 16th century, but it seems that the old Egyptians already knew how to use it.

Ratten Aaß – that threw me a bit off : “Aas” is a rotting carcass, but this would make no sense altogether in this sentence. A look in the holy Wörterbuch (Ger., Eng.) helped : aasz is not a cadaver, it’s something to eat, from ezan, essen ; the old word “Atzung” for food comes to my memory ; also an old word in my dialect, “aas[z]en” for stuffing oneself, over eating.

Wurmkrämer – A “Krämer” sells “Kram” – clobber, stuff, he’s a monger, a peddler. Is there a medieval worm-business I have not heard of ? Also Messers GRIMM can help : A Wurmkrämer sells drugs, “Arzney & Theriak”, against worms, parasites inhabiting the human body, a not uncommon illness in medieval Europe.

The sellers of anti-worm drugs know to prepare deadly rat-food from a plant called mice-bulb. The murine onions were not that deadly that  a cat who’d bit or munch on a poisoned mouse would also suffer. This is discussed in chapter III “Vom underscheid / so sich zwischen Guten und Bösen Geistern erhelt” (About the difference between good and bad spirits). Wurmkrämer – herrje …